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Poll Results for the following Question:

Do you feel the massage therapy market is flooded with too many similar techniques that are trademarked and/or marketed as original?

Results:

Yes
49.5%
No
40.3%
I don't know
10.3%

Total Respondents: 780

Comments:

Note: These comments are reproduced as written by visitors to this Web site.
They have not been edited for content, grammar, or spelling.


Anonymous
No  As a practicing therapist of many years I find the trend to simplify massage to a few insurance company approved techniques, approval codes and the like quite disturbing.



Anonymous
No The bottom line is there only as many different techniques as the market can bear and right now it's pretty healthy situation for growth and innovation in massage therapy today.




No  The English language has only one word for the many dimensions of love. Other languages deliniate romantic love, familial love, spiritual love, and on. It's no wonder English speaking western extreme right hand dominate mind is confused, repressed and in denial of the subtle variations and nuiance of touch. Go to any public place in the world and watch couples communicate. In English speaking areas couples touch far less. The male members of these cultures are frequently resistant to explore massage, rigid in their thoughts and stuck on the antiquated idea that their is only one way to reach from Earth to Heaven.


Yes Massage therapy is a health care discipline. A lot of people have made a lot of money marketing their techniques, which are actually just variations on themes. The sooner we recognize that there are a certain number of ways of touching bodies, with many individual variations, the sooner we will be able to establish ourselves as a respected discipline.

James H. Clay


Yes The field of massage or bodywork has expanded to where more than one fields of expertise becomes a new technique. Providing identification of the basic forms would help to place this problem in perspective. For instance: The Therapist provides
1/3 deep tissue, 1/3 acupressure, and 1/3 polarity. Tapotement, effleurage is used to transition. The touch is light at first and slows as it becomes a deeper. Gaining a base level understanding of the original techniques and allowing for advances of those techniques should clarify what is someone else or did they just modify the technique or added say Reiki for a particular reason. It won't be easy to say something is not original, but like the airplane, each new idea should be supported and researched before admission is gained into the realm of massage. This is accomplished somewhat in the chiropractic and music world. Stephen Young, AP,LMT


No  If You don't think, there's a need for new techniques, just take an advanced swedish class and stop being so manipulative. Personally I want to evolve.

Anonymous
I don't know BUBYE COURTNEY YULE BE MISSED...

Anonymous
Yes I get a sinking feeling as soon as the copywrite symbol appears after the capitalized or italicized name of the modality. We are entitled to earn our living any legit way we can, but we must also consider the effect upon the general public. It appears to too many people that we are just creating new and expensive ways of promising something--a fix, relief, cure, etc. But we are not educating anyone. This extends to those of us in the profession. The high cost of seminars for CEU purposes is an example of this "special modality explosion." Most of the seminars are rehashed or relabeled methods that have been around for some time. Maybe we are all getting too much exposure for too little results.

Anonymous
 FROM COURTNEY

THE FIRST COMMENTS UNDER MY NAME WERE MINE. THE OTHERS ARE BY SOMEONE USING MY NAME, WHICH I GUESS I SHOULD BE FLATTERED BUT I'M NOT.

I DON'T WANT TO PLAY YOUR GAMES SO I'LL MOVE ON SOMEWHERE ELSE WHERE PEOPLE ARE SERIOUS.

THANK YOU AND GOODBYE


Anonymous
 FROM COURTNEY

THE FIRST COMMENTS UNDER MY NAME WERE MINE. THE OTHERS ARE BY SOMEONE USING MY NAME, WHICH I GUESS I SHOULD BE FLATTERED BUT I'M NOT.

I DON'T WANT TO PLAY YOUR GAMES SO I'LL MOVE ON SOMEWHERE ELSE WHERE PEOPLE ARE SERIOUS.

THANK YOU AND GOODBYE



No  I am so sorry. I seem to have forgotten to take my medication and am just not thinking strait these dayz. I had a client complain to the state board about me and I have been just a nervous wreck.

Please accept my humblest apologies and if somone from the Massage Today could erase my previous obnoxios opinions I would be so grateful.

Truly,

COURTNEY

God Bless America
IMPEACH BUSH!

jane_wheeler @cs.com
No  You people are way silly. Stop smokin' that crack it only makes you agressive and confused. If someone chooses not to enter their email address the web site automaticly labels them "anonymous". If you read through all the post you'll realize there are different opinions attributed to anonymous.
For the record I think some valid points have been brought up by both sides though I'm leaning towards no.
Jane Wheeler RMT PT


I don't know  What a shame to see those in the healing arts attacking each other. Courtney, you should be ashamed for starting this. Your behavior is like that of a 5 year old.
sincerely,
Phil RMT

Anonymous
I don't know ANONYMOUS has alot of opinions but no credibility. Opinions are like a..h...s, so we know what ANONYMOUS IS FULL OF.............


Anonymous
No Amen on the need for regime change in the U.S. unfortunately the right wing want everyone to have only one mind and not think for themselves.

COURTNEY


Yes Here in Montreal we except everyone for what they are. Freedom is only found in your own mind and everything else is relative to it's own nature.

When the U.S. Goverment finally takes control and organizes a standard by which massage therapy is governed, massage in the United States will continue to be substandard compared to the Canadian Model.

The RIGHT WING REGIME in the U.S. puts to much emphasis on the individual and does not take into consideration the needs of those that are not as capable of making their own decisions.

Take heed my southern friends confusion will pass and a clear road will appear once your goverment returms to a more liberal setting. Only then can a fair and level standard of techniques be established.

I wish you the best on your journey and will be waiting on you when you arrive.

Jacques Burke RDA, DC. MS, RMT

Anonymous
Yes HEY COURTNEY

FROME THE SHADOWS

" GO GET 'EM"


Yes to whom it may concern

I most humbly apologize for using full caps in my comments. It was really inconsiderate of me to be blind and have an opinion. I guess I have to except my place in this world of left wing ideas of being correct.

At least I have guts enough to tell who I am and be proud of what I think. I am an individual and I don't subscribe to expressing an opinion from the shadows.

THANK YOU FOR YOUR OPINIONS.

COURTNEY






Anonymous
No  God forbid we should have some fanatic right wing regulatory agency or boisterous individuals attempt to tell us there are only certain types of massage and techniques that can be taught and practiced. If there are folks teaching bogus "new" massage, people will stop taking their workshops as we massage therapist types are inclined to speak our mind and are way into to word of mouth. The bottom line is there only as many different techniques as the market can bear and right now it's pretty healthy situation for growth and innovation in massage therapy today.

Anonymous
 Please turn off your Caps Lock so you aren't using UPPER CASE LETTERS through your entire post. From a usability standpoint it is hard to read. ALL UPPER CASE also refered to as SHOUTING is considered rude in web land.


Yes THERE ARE MANY METHODS OF ACCOMPLISHING THE SAME RESULTS. I THINK ALOT OF WHAT IS CALLED "NEW" IS JUST A SLIGHT VARIATION OF TECHNIQUES THAT ALREADY EXISTS. ALTHOUGH OCCASIONALLY SOMEONE CAN REALLY COME UP WITH SOME REALLY GOOD STUFF.

AFTER A FEW YEARS OF DOING MASSAGE, I NOW AM MORE INTERESTED IN THE BASICS AND THEIRY OF NEW TECHNIQUES THAN THE MECHANICS OF THE WORK.

WHITNEY LOWE HAS DEVELOPED AN EXCELLENT WAY OF ASSESSING MUSCLE AND NERVE PROBLEMS. AARON MATHES HAS A VERY GOOD ISOLATED STRETCHING PROGRAM. MANY TECHNIQUES ARE CUTTING EDGE BUT THERE ARE ALOT WITH A GOOD MARKETING PROGRAM BUT THAT IS ABOUT ALL I CAN SAY ABOUT IT AND BE NICE.

I FEEL THAT MASSAGE IS AN ART AND MUCH OF WHAT I DO IS JUST WHAT I SENSE WILL WORK FOR THE CONDITION I AM TRYING TO TREAT.

THANKS....COURTNEY HAYNES



No Approaching each client and session with a child like mind encourages innovation. Wake each morning as a new day and each moment as the precious and individual now.


  Dennis Simpson, owner of CO School of Healing
Arts is quoted as saying, "Nothing new by nobody
special." That reflects my belief about the ever
evolving, co creating experience of practicing body
centered work.

Anonymous
No  I am the director of spa services at one of the finest destination spas in the world. I worked my way up through the ranks from humble beginnings as a massage therapist. I see at least two possible answers to this question. If one is in private practice there can be a slight marketing advantage to focusing on one or two techniques. Through word of mouth and/or advertising one may develop a large cliental based on proficiency in a narrow subset of modalities. In spa services quite the opposite is appropriate. Clients are familiar with a broad palate of techniques. One believes myofacial release is a proper massage, another prefers pressure point work, yet another responds to cranio sacral or zero balancing and so on... The truly gifted therapist has exposure to the myriad of techniques and is able to customize the session to each clients individual needs. I do retain a handful of therapist who specialize in one or two styles, though the vast majority of my 100+ massage staff are those who are diverse and creative.

Anonymous
No  I think more unique techniques should be developed, to foster more understanding. The more people we can affect through nurturing touch the more peaceful our world will be. The body, mind and spirit are a whole, yet each individual is distinctly different as is each therapist approach. The more information therapist have to address the whole person, the better. Rather than having to go to 'several' specialists, a client can have his/her whole being addressed with the best, latest and most inclusive information.


Anonymous
I don't know I don't have as much of problem with similar techniques as I do with therapists who take only one introductory course in a complex modality and then advertise that they are an expert in that technique. The number of therapists who truly understand and are skilled in, for example, craniosacral-, myofascial- or lymphatic drainage therapies or structural integration are a handful relative to the number of therapists who claim to be proficient. Any time I see a therapist advertising a large 'menu' of techniques, I am immediately suspicious that they are a dabbler of all and a master of none.

Anonymous
Yes I think more similar techniques should be consolidated,
rather than causing more categories. It feels like a
marketing ploy. The body is a whole. The more information
each therapist has to address the whole person, the better.
Rather than having to go to several 'specialists', a client can
have his/her whole being addressed with the best, latest
and most inclusive information.


Yes I get so excited when I here of a new style...but then I learn it's what I know already.
Ya, it's sometimes flooded and sometimes not flooded, but the creek is starting to overflow with continuous rain showers for the next decade.

Anonymous
No  The reason there appears to be such a broad array of techniques is because they are inddeed subtle yet profoundly different. It's true where the uncultured eye merely sees red the enlightened understand ruby, maroon, fuchsia, crimson, tomato...

Anonymous
No  As a spa director at a major Lake Tahoe resort, I find the diversity of styles a positive selling point. No longer are my wealthy clients satisfied with a plain "brown bag" Swedish massage when they can achieve an enlightening experience through our signature technique de jour. Each of our hand picked therapist are unique in their approach. .We encourage and provide monetary incentive to those willing to expand their range of possible modalities. Viva la diffŽrence!


Yes Being a manager at a major hotel/casino in Reno, I am the one to hire and interview applicants for massage, I am a LMT and Licensed Cosmetologist. I find an enormous similarity of styles quoted by applicant and the similarity in a large number of explainations to what type of nmassage the technique involves. We are all in the helpful healing art of massage, and if we are sincere in our profession we develope such styles that suit us through education and study. To say we do a number of techniques that are so similar that the difference is hard to distinguish is plain hype and worst of all is that when someone is saying this they them selves know it is hype.

Anonymous
Yes Many of "western" massgage techniques are "borrowed" from Asian techniques. It is a shame that people can rename it; get a trademark in America for something thye didn't orginate.

Anonymous
Yes I wouldn't use the term flooded, but there are many techniques offered that sound different until you study them. Then they are revealed as just another therapist's interpetation of something already learned.

This "flood" of techniques serves two bad purposes. 1st we as therapists lose money and time gaining no truely new skills and 2nd the public, our customers, are confused even more about what to look for when selecting a massage treatment.

I have not included my email address for the simple reason that this is my opinion. I do not want my email flooded by those who seem to live to argue with every point of view that is different. Plus I get enough spam just using my email to communicate with friends and family. I would suggest using the magazine forum to say you feel I am wrong. That way we both express our opinions and there is no arguement.





No  What an odd way to ask a question. It's as though you want people to say there are too many similar techniques without allowing for a clear discussion. As a practicing therapist of many years I find the trend to simplify massage to a few insurance company approved techniques, approval codes and the like quite disturbing. Over structuralization destroys creativity as we attempt to shove all into one standardized testing tubby hole. Albert Einstein nearly flunked out of school and was forced into a meanial clerical job at the patent office due to his inability to pass standerdized test. The Descartian methodolgy of disecting things down to a single cause and effect stagnates our "educational system". Allow for creativity, allow for innovation and allow yourself fluidity of thought.


Yes I believe that Joe Q Consumer has a hard time wading through the minor variations of similar techniques. The inovators behind the creation of specific techniques are motivated by several things. First and rightfully so is the monitary gain that comes from training others. This is just good business. Second is knowledge sharing and being excited to share what you have discovered. Third is ego. Fourth is keeping the modality pure. I am not sure what the answer is to keeping the consumer educated about all the nuances and variations of all the techniques. I do know that the consumer is not as concerned with the differences as we(massage therapists) are if the result achieved is the result advocated by each technique claim. I believe this subject ties in with the past poll question about the Nat Cert Test and what is happening in NJ and Miss, and where our profession may be heading. It concernes me that we may let our egos get in the way of taking control of our profession before law makers do it for us.

AnonyMouse ;)
No  Massage and Music have been around for hundreds of thousands of years, along with most of the techniques and scales. Just ask any monkey swinging from a tree, he'll tell you ooh ooh oohh, which translates to something like, "My moma told me so, pick a key, any key, I'll scratch your back if you'll scratch mine, can you please pass the banana?". The originators are long gone unless you ask a Reiki Master. The so called new originals are only those capitalizing on existing techniques that they have improved upon. There is nothing new under the Sun with the exception of the appearance of those new Sun spots this week. That hardly makes it original, softly maybe as all points are debatable if one has a large sum of money and a connected person to lobby in your favor. Massage therapy and Music Theory are in a perpetual evolving state, as it should be. There are always those who will want to exalt themselves by claiming territory that can not be owned like say Ali Babba Bush and his band of thieves in regards to Iraq, Iran or Afghanistan.

Anonymous
Yes Yes, it confusses potential clients and makes it difficult for therapists to determine a career path.



Anonymous
Yes Massage has been around for thousands of years, along with most of the techniques. The originators are long gone. The so called new originals are only those capitalizing on existing techniques that they have improved upon. That hardly makes it original. Massage therapy is in a perpetual evolving state, as it should be. There are always those who will want to exalt themselves by claiming territory that can not be owned.


No I think that each person's technique and touch is unique. That is what makes massage an art and a science. When selling your services you must be able to market them in way that attracks attention. Trademarking is just one way it is done not only in massage but in many other professions.

Anonymous
No In survey speak this is refered to as a "leading question". I'll present a leading question from the opposite perspective.

Do you feel the massage therapy market could benefit from a variety of new innovative and/or original techniques?




Yes In our work, the general goals of any particular technique are
really quite simple: allow the client to release neuromuscular
tension, mobilize fascial restrictions, and encourage circulation.
Some techniques emphasize one aspect more than others, but
they all overlap to some degree. All the different modalities are
simply different ways of achieving these same goals. What is
needed is not more techniques, but a greater awareness that
what matters is HOW the technique is applied. This enters the
realm of client-therapist communication and individualized
assessment. While techniques can simply be memorized and
performed, communication and assessment actually require
critical thinking skills and WORK to learn. Hence, they are less
marketable to your average massage therapist, who got into the
profession partly to avoid the rigors of serious academic work
and is more prone to buy into the whole bodywork guru/
personality cult/magic pill sham that is the general current state
of continuing massage therapy education.


Yes It would be helpful if developers of different approaches would list all the other techniques that they
have used in the passed that have influenced them.
This gives potential students an idea of the original components of their approach. For example Myers often mentions how Feldenkrais and Rolf have helped him develop his particular way of seeing.
In the end most long time learners find an approach that "speaks" to them.In a way long time learners are their own originators/developers of a different way of touching humanity.

Anonymous
Yes and its so confusing everybody has a different word for the same meaning. and its sad especially to those just getting out of school.
but I guess we all have to make a living.


Yes Too many times I have see or received adds of a new technique or course, too find this is only a variation of style or presentation. In the last year I am starting to see adds that put down or claim to be better then or claim that one technique is a copy of their techniques.
New professional coming into this are overwhelmed with names techniques claims. Clients are left to wade through names, claims, train jargon and miss representation to find the skill or therapist to best suit their needs. Students looking to enroll in programs are face with this same problem. At some pint the profession is going to be forced to regulate itself or regulation will be forced on the profession.


Anonymous
No not many techniques but many dumb and useless instructors teaching them

Anonymous
Yes I have been to a seminar that claimed the technique being taught was learned in England, only to find out later it was being taught here in the states for years long before he came up with the concept.


No I aplaude people who follow their passions of healing and can transform that passion into a viable profession.


Yes This month's question hits the nail on the head. I thought about that idea just this week and why there are so many techniques claiming to be different yet are the same.


Yes So many people need a scam or a new book or video to make a living. The Bodywork teachers remind of Magicians as once you know how the trick is done, it's over. Then they become like Musicians and they sell us a video of their greatest "hits!" (techniques) They also tell you in their class, "this isn't the way I work in my clinic." A very big teacher told us after three days," If you learn 4 or 5 techniques your doing good." I wanted to write him a check for $ 20.00. Another charged my small class $300.00 a day per person for a 4 1/2 hour class. I have almost 4000 hours of training and I taught and directed Leadership schools in the Army for 14 years. It sad what we are left with after a "weekend seminar."

Gregg Hill RMT RYT


Yes From listening to other massage therapist talk, its obvious that many MT take various workshops. Then when they give a massage, they combine various techniques even though they advertise that they are doing a specific technique or modality. Thereby, confusing the public even more.

Anonymous
Yes Yes, I do believe that we have too many techniques out here. In my opinion when I put my hands on someone and use any of the basic or deep tissue strokes, it is called massage. The other alphabet soup (MAT, NMT etc) are nice little techniques to use, however, they may not necessarily work for everyone and to have to be "certified" in them is ludicrous. I applaud those who have the ability to market those techniques. I on the other hand may have discovered those techniques myself, but have no interest in marketing them, nor do I want to take the classes taught in order to be "certified".


Yes This is not true in all cases, but so many modalities or techniques are merely new brands of an existing modality. Cheer and Tide are both laundry detergent, not differnt product categories. For that matter, Cheer with Bleach is not either. Clients are overwhelmed. They don't know the differnce between many techniques which makes communication difficult.

Anonymous
Yes but there probley r no more

Anonymous
 The best training I have had was from a gentleman by the name of Raul Flores from San Anatonio TX. His technique got rid of the "let me kill you while I also kill my thumb" deep tissue mentality. Good job Raul!! Still waiting for you to come to El Paso.


Yes I am an Ashiatsu Oriental Bar Therapist (Deepfeet.com) and love it, wish I could talk ALL my clients into letting me walk on them. The differences I've noticed between Ashiatsu and normal barefoot shiatsu are that 1: I don't get the Shiatsu theory training, and 2: I'm up on a table, rather than the floor. Not that big of a difference to me. Sometimes I wonder why it became its own modality.


No  There shud only be one or two styles of massage allowed. Like hamburgers joints in my town every Tom, Dick and Hairy used to lay claim that they made a special burger. I am so glad and/or pleased we have only the truely original grill masters in my town, McDonalds and Wendies. Cud yew get them fancy Massuer organ iZ nations to lobby for sum legislation fer limitin this maddenin flood simlar tequniquesindignations?

Anonymous
No  Let diversity be.
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