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Poll Results for the following Question:

Should medical doctors be allowed to perform massage?

Results:

Yes
54.1%
No
45.9%

Total Respondents: 625

Comments:

Note: These comments are reproduced as written by visitors to this Web site.
They have not been edited for content, grammar, or spelling.



 No, unless they are trained extensively. I honour my 3000 hours of training and feel that if they were to practise it without training it would devalue me.

Anonymous
Yes I believe the Chinese have it right. In China you must be a physician before becoming a massage therapist. This is how seriously mssage therapy (Anma) is taken in the place where it was founded.


No No Leave it to the Massage therapists they know more about the soft tissue, but let the Doctors learn and send people for massages.


 
First the Doctor needs the training on how to release the problem painfull areas. Does the doctor have the time to do this? Pain or relaxation therapy is a specialty best left for other properly trained therapists to perform.

Ronlmt


Yes I am a Certified and Permitted Massage Therapist myself. Will be for one year come September. I completly agree that us Therapists don't have the earned repect the way we should. I had not worked to almost one year as a result. It seems that no one understands that we are healers by nature and do a very good job at doing so. When are we going to get the respect we deserve? I do realize that things get tough, but why make us suffer in the process?


Yes As long as they go through the proper certification and schooling process that registered massage therapist do.
However medical doctors have enough to do, hopefully they will leave that up to the specialist and refer that person that nees massage over to a therapist.


Yes well i think yes as long as they have in their possion a valid massage therapy license


Yes Yes,I believe that Dr's educated in the art of massage have the same legal rights as any Massage Therapist. But the key words here are "EDUCATED". Having a Doctorate does not entitle one to perform surgery, so it shouldn't allow a person to perform massage unless it is part of their education.....reguardless of "scope of practice".

Anonymous
 only with the correct training


No No; unless they are registered massage therapists. I would say the same of nurses; if they are RMT's, okay. I sit on an advisory committee - on complimentary care - at MacMastery University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada; and in discussing education with the chair of the committee I mentioned that in massage college we did 350 hours of anatomy and physiology, she said that that was more A&P than she did in her BScN degree. So, massage therapists have a solid understanding of how the body works and in most cases - comapred to doctors and nurses - a better understanding of the musculature of the body. Also, where in medical or nursing school are massage theory, principles and manipulations taught?
Just a few points to ponder.
S. Cook

Yes Sure,Doctors should be allowed to perform massage, after they go through the training... which lacks greatly in some school's. After all they don't get the (hands on) experience of actually working with the systems of our bodies as a Doctor. Most of them probly are not in good enough shape to perform 5-7 full body massages a day. In a lot of cases 90% of the people graduating are not in good shape. But this is not promoted and emphasized in massage school's. They do need to learn what it takes to be a massage therapist.


Yes Yes, provided they have received the proper techniques and training to relieve the patient's pain; otherwise, give a referral to a professional

Anonymous
Yes Being a 4th year medical student myself demonstrates that obtaining an MD and currently finishing up my massage therapy courses benefits my patients as a whole. With the correct education and training Doctor's have the same training as MT and that's what it takes to help our pt.'s education and experience!

Anonymous
Yes With a minimum of 150 hours of training specifically in massage.

Anonymous
No Nobody should be allowed to perfom the application of massage unless they have been properly trained. Anyone can give a massage but not everyone knows the protocols of treating a patient efectively by performing medical massage. Just like anyone person who has recieved an injection can stick someone but the question is are they trained where they can be affective and also cause no harm

Anonymous
 No,I think medical doctors have their own field cut out for them. Some don't take enough time with their patients as it is......patients are hearded through. To get a massage in a doctor's office would be different in the fact that a massage therapist would need to be hired. If doctors would begin this the insurances might listen to how beneficial massage is.....but again the price would be untouchable. Anyway that is my opinion.

Anonymous
No I have read many of the arguements on the yes side - and many of them said "as long as they have the proper training". Well - if an MD had proper training, they would be a massage therapist - and the point would be moot. Doctors don't have the training to do massage - if they want to spend the extra time to add that to the practice, more power to them, but it is essential to have the license, because thier motto is "do no harm", and yes - an improper massage CAN do harm!


No I am in school to become a massage therapist. While many people think that all we learn in school is just how to rub muscles in the right way - this is not the case. We have extensive classes on how each muscle works in conjunction with all the others, and how to "fix" various pathologies of the muscle. There are specific strokes to do for specific injuries, and there are many contraindications. Doctors are taught so much information in Medical school that they would not have time to take the technique classes that are required to proficient in medical massage. Instead - It might be a good idea for massage therapists and MD's to team up together to form a comprehensive treatment plan.


No My opinion is that unless someone has the requisite
certification and training they should not perform
professional massage services.
Anonymous
No Massage is a very specialized technique and should be REFERRED by doctors, yes, but not performed by them.


No Specific indiviuals are allowed to perform "specific" massage as it pertains to thier profession. This would include Dr.s. Should they be able to perform Massage therapy on a whole body? No! Most Physicians while having a more western minded understanding of anatomy & physiology have not got the foggiest idea of what a massage is capable of.

Anonymous
No i think this is going to be out of their scope until they get the correct muscle techniques required of any one entering the profession. it is not required and doctors don't allow the correct time frame to apply such therapies. Why would doctors need to do massage therapies to patients?why can't they have a massage therapist on staff or for a referal....


Yes  with additional training of massage. then they can practice if they have to right eduction.

Anonymous
No Not unless they are also licensed massage therapists. They don't have the necessary knowledge and training to do professional massage.

Anonymous
 Only with the appropriate training and certification. I'm not opposed to physicians using more touch in their regular services (that could benefit both patient and physician) and it would be wonderful if more physicians understood more about the benefits of massage...but unless they are trained and certified to perform massage, they should not be allowed to charge the pateint more for the service...


Yes I think doctors should be allowed to perform massage as long as they are certified or licensed like everyone else that legitimately practices. Most of them would probably make excellent massage therapists because of their in-depth knowledge of human anatomy and physiology. I've met way to many self-proclaimed "massage therapists" that have no working knowledge of the human body, which is a shame. Obtaining and maintaining an understanding of the human/life sciences is so very important in this field. So yes, as long as the doctor has been properly trained and exercises an open mind and compassion about the subject, I believe they have the right to perform massage on clients. Possibly even the duty to give those services, since most of us know in our hearts the validity of this type of therapy and its effectiveness. Robert Hand (CMT)


Yes Of course they should be allowed to perform massage therapy, however the stigma that therapists receive from physicians should be dissolved.


Yes yes, but still the client to inquire other means of healing also. IT is about the person health right?! that will give a therapist to focus more.

Anonymous
Yes Only if they are fully qualified and have been trained at an approved school. Most medical doctors I know would not have this kind of time to go back to school, but would probably find great benefits if they decided to become licensed as massage therapists as well.

Anonymous
Yes MY GOD YES!!!
What you all fail to realize is that physicians have the highest academic training in health care. There are specialties in the health professions such as physical medicine, physiatry and chiropractic, that utilize massage. But not to worry, 99% of physicians are to busy treating to many patients, and don't have time to perform a 60 minute massage. To the people who state that physicians should have a formal education in massage I say this; a physicians training far outweighs a massage therapists. Like or lump it, thats the way it is. Massage is an instinctual art that a child subconsciously uses to treat any bumped body part. This reaction is an inborn reflex to pain and it is a routine. It is rediculous to say physicians need formal massage training to learn a routine. There are many routines. Physicians already understand in greater depth all of the hard and clinical sciences taught in massage schools and much more. Massage is a very noninvasive procedure and you would have to have a total lack of common sense to hurt someone. Above all do no harm is the oath. I don't believe or see a physician harming anyone with massage. Besides if it wasn't for physicians performing research on massage the profession would not advance due to the majority of uneducated massage therapists not even being able to begin to comprehend how to perform a proper research study. Also, 99.9% of massage therapists only want to massage, do little continuing education and do not want to perform proper research. It's the PT's and Clinical Acupuncturists and Masters of Oriental Medicine we should be worried about. They want to limit our scope. They want to be the goverinig body over us for things like the practice of Shiatsu. They want to limit us to Swedish and western massage techniques. The physicians are our friends. They could fight us on the topic of being direct access providers but they don't! They perform the research we should be doing! Physicians support a broad scope of massage practice while the PT's and the Oriental Medicine masters, "doctors" and clinical acupuncturists want to controll and limit massage. Wake up people! Think... before you speak!


Yes Sort of a silly question, but why not? Should not everyone be able to give and receive massage. Exactly Tha has been happening throughout history. Now, massage may not be profitable enough for an M.D. to keep their malpractice insurance or downtown office and receptionist, but if thats their desire, more power to em. I cannot fathom as to why some voters are against this idea? If the M.D. is successful, many would get bodywork that would otherwise never have it. If the M.D. is not successful, still many would be exposed to bodywork, and perhaps go knocking on the door of the local MT.

Anonymous
Yes Of course! Medical doctors are people too, and many of them became doctors in order to help others. There is no sense denying them what may be a powerful healing tool. That said, the playing field should be level -- medical doctors should have to meet the same massage licensing standards the rest of us have to, without exceptions.

Anonymous
 With proper training, it would definitly help them to provide better care to patients.

Anonymous
Yes They should as long as they took the necessary training in touch related modalities.


No No! No! No! We can't diagnose or prescribe, so they shouldn't be able to do massage unless they have had the proper instruction, creditation, and lisencing! What's up with that? That question shouldn't have even needed to be asked! -Sunni with Sunshine Services, VA Beach, VA.

Anonymous
Yes Why not? I do not think that anyone has to worry that they may start anytime soon, as most MD's DC's do not have the time to do STM techniques, unless they employ someone to do so.

Anonymous
Yes why not?

Anonymous
No Doctors are basically not sensitive enough to perform massage and from what so many individuals have stated to me, they are not able to get sufficient time with the doctor for what they are being treated for. Doctors do not spend an hour or more with patients who are trying to obtain preventive treatments with the thought of keeping themselves out of a doctors office.
Jordan


No I don't think they should be allowed to because then that would put most massage therapists' out of business.

Anonymous
Yes Medical Doctors certainly know the anatomical structures in the body enough to do certain techniques of MT ( I know some that do trigger point and myofascial release). I am not so sure that they could do some techniques without further training. I find it difficult to believe they would have enough time to perform massage, that is what we are for.


No 
Let doctors concentrate on their fields, and I shall do likewise. I have seen and heard of too many ''Oops's'' from what they do as it is. If they dont have the time to spend more than five minutes with a patient, how the hell are they going to get close to doing a remotely deacent massage.

And with the prices they charge for consultations. Imagine what the price of a 30 or 60 minute massage would be... Let them have their fun. Sick jokes also provide a laugh.


Yes as long as they have a massage education

Anonymous
Yes Yes, if they have adequate training


No let the doctors be lazy and soak up their paychecks


No Doctors should have full accreditation and registration as a Massage Therapist if they intend to practice. This would seem a waste of their valuable time when GP's already have time pressure issues to deal with. They cannot be allowed to give a 'quick-fix'. Also, Massage doesn't lend itself to a mechanical approach, rather a 'wholistic' one that takes into consideration the spiritual and emotional aspects of therapy. These aspects are normally not allowed for in the busy schedule Doctors have to comply with. Medical referral is the best option.

Anonymous
Yes But only if they are trained and certified in massage.


No If a doctor has not attended a physical therapy training program or an alternative healing school I feel that they should not be allowed to do massage. Most doctors are not trained in learning palpable skills and therefore have a higher rate I feel of causing a patient further stress to an injury due lack of these skills and could potentally injure a patient or go beyond a patients boundries without a patients conscent and respect of that individual.

Anonymous
 they should be allowed to perform once trained and licensed, but massage should not be taken over by the medical community.

Anonymous
No let's preserve the art!

anon
Yes If a doctor wishes to go to the massage therapy schools, then of course they can practice. However, in California for example, massage therapy is still by statute, listed as "adult entertainment". Before any doctor should be allowed to practice massage therapy, the law needs to be changed to get massage therapy into the "health care" codes. Even if doctors dont practice massage therapy, the codes need changing

Anonymous
No No, I believe that doctors need to be educated and licensed in the area of massage therapy if they intend to provide treatment. If not, they should refer their patients to a licensed massage therapist.

Thank You,

Corina Villarreal
Mercedes, Texas

Anonymous
Yes aslong as they have the proper massage training

Anonymous
Yes i think they should be allowed only if they are fully
qualified and have done a massage course. as a massage therapist i feel doctors do not give massage much of a thought so it would be good if they actually were trained in other techniques of healing therefor i think many people would benefit from this.

Anonymous
Yes Yes, only if the medical doctor has had professional training in massage therapy.


No Absolutely not! Massage therapists are not allowed to perform surgery or administer or prescribe medicines, so why should they be allowed to do our job?


Yes Yes, if they go through the proper training/massage school, pass exam, etc. Should a Massage Therapist be allowed practice/perform medicine? Yes, if they go to the proper training/medical school and pass exams, etc.

A typical medical doctor spendsless then 15 minutes w/a patient, would they really want to do massage? A 15 minute chair massage may be?


 The issue is one of the oldest tenets in medicine: "First do no harm!" Baseline medical training in human anatomy and physiology is an order of magnitude more comprehensive and detailed than that associated with most massage therapists. Even if most doctors don't massage their clients often enough to acquire the "touch" that most experienced massage therapists take for granted, they are certainly competent to know what areas NOT to massage.


Yes As long as they've attended an accredited school and met the minimum required hours and credits and have passed the state and national certification requirements for any licensed/certified massage therapist, and are required to take the same ethics courses and meet the same recertification requirements and annual continuing education credits; In other words, if they meet the criteria for practicing therapeutic massage, why would there be any question?

Anonymous
No I do not believe medical doctors have the proper training to perform massages. They do not spend 1000 hours learning the proper techniques.


Yes I vote yes and no! I believe doctor's could be allowed to perform massage provided they undergo the same practical training that each particular state/province requires. As with any technical profession, and specifically in our profession, to provide safe and effective massage, persons practising Massage should be expected to perform a certain number of practical hours on a range of client body types, followed by a practical evaluation to ensure quality assurance to the public.
Without these qualifications, the doctor should not be permitted to practice Massage Therapy at his/her leisure. As a Doctor, the public is assured of competent Medical theoretical knowledge, and therefore they may be exempt from certain courses within a Massage Therapy program, however, their practical application of massage, utilizing their theoretical knowledge must be up to par as well.

Kerri Olds, B.Kin,RMT
Hamilton, Ontario

Anonymous
No "Should medical doctors be allowed to perform massage?" Well, any healthy person should be allowed to perform massage as long as they are properly trained and licensed. However, as a current student of massage therapy, I would not like to see my career choice wiped out by physicians taking this into their own hands (so to speak). From my experience with medical doctors, they simply don't have an hour to work with a client on a personal and spiritual level and the client / patient would ultimately be cheated out of the quality massage experience and care they deserve. So, my response is NO. Keep them distinctly seperate and special unto themselves.


No medical doctors should concentrate on drugs related remedies.


No Medical doctors are not trained in massage or in muscle manipulation. If they went to massage school and learned all the techniques, that would be fine. However, I think it would be best for them to concentrate on their field and allow bodyworkers to do what they specialize in.
Thank you.

Anonymous
No I would not like to see medical doctors doing massage. My experience in life is that they (at least the ones I have had contact with) do not have an adequate knowledge of the muscles, origins, insertions and functions. If doctors want to go through the same training as massage therapists and get licensed, certified, etc., then they should go for it. Licensed massage therapists have had the training to do beneficial, therapeutic massage.

Anonymous
No I would not like to see medical doctors doing massage. My experience in life is that they (at least the ones I have had contact with) do not have an adequate knowledge of the muscles, origins, insertions and functions. If doctors want to go through the same training as massage therapists and get licensed, certified, etc., then they should go for it. Licensed massage therapists have had the training to do beneficial, therapeutic massage.

Anonymous
No Now who is stepping on who's toes? LMT's are
so restricted in what we can and can't say and do.
Leave the massage to us and leave the medical
treatments to the doctors!


No In the healthcare system already the M.D. treats patients like cattle why would they ever consider to do Massage therapy and take their time to spend with a patient, let alone the Insurance companies DO NOT cover massage as a benefits...so basicly this is inconceivable that the M.D. would ever do therapy on his/her patient when they cannot even take history on a patient without their assistant doing it for them...instead take two of these pills, go to Physical Therapy for 3x a week for 4 weeks and maybe I'll return your call in the morning.


No Not unless they are Certified or Licenced in Massage Therapy.

Glenn


No If the drs do massages then they don't need the nurses to help them with the work. So it better for them to not do massages and let us therapists help them like the nurses help them. We therapists take time with the clients and the drs never take thier time with the clients. They (drs) just want to hurry and get the work done. So it better for the drs NOT to perform and massages.


Yes My yes vote is conditional upon the MD completing an appropriate course in whatever modality the indivual wishes to perfoprm.
Same as if the MD wante4d to practice accpunture, he or she would be required to complete a reconized educational program and take whatever exam would be appropiate.

No As a massage therapist I can't and don't diagnos patients or clients because that is not in my scope. I feel that other practioners and therapist believe they can perform massage therapy with a two to three day over-view of the basic skills. I pride myself on being a Massage Therapist and on my continueing education in our field. If we continue to let Healthcare Profesional push us aside and keep the the public ingorant of our true abilities to be a part of the Healthcare Profession (Only does of us who want to be) we will never be able to get pass the "Feel Good" status of massage and empower the public with the Clinical Benifits of our choosen profession.

Marvin Q. Joiner B.S., R.M.T, A.E.S

Anonymous
Yes At first I shuddered at the question. But why not? If one has the desire to learn and incorporate the benefits of a healing touch to their current field, whether it be a medical docor, registered nurse or vet tech, by all means do so. So long as the person has undergone the proper training (not some weekend workshop), and attained certification/licensure.


Yes If we believe that touch is key to healing, to deny any healthcare practitioner the right and encouragement to touch would block one avenue for people to be exposed to touch as part of their healing journey. --Rick

Anonymous
No The medical profession has been "telling" us massage therapists and others for years that we are not medical doctors. For insurance to pay us, most of the time we need a perscription from a doctor okaying our services. We have spent hours and years training for massage as doctors have spent training in their specialty. Massage is our specialty. Medicine is theirs. Lets keep it separate, please.

No Why would they want to? Haven't they got enough to do. They should only be allow if they are trained to do so, just like anyone else.

No A medical degree is no guarantee that the touch will be appropriate, caring, comfortable,present,or ensure the physician understands what he/she is feeling, what depth they are at, or the texture, tonus, and response to their touch by any individual.Technology has replaced "touch" for far too many physicians, and they know it. As a therapist, instructor, and trainer who has worked with our brothers and sisters who are conventionally trained, most have no knowledge and experience regarding the art or science of touch that heals... That is why so many complain about the 'indifferent doctor touch' they or their loved ones receive. As an example, I recently "trained a pediatrician, and working mom whose daughter will not latch, cries and fusses when held, and demonstrates significant stress when doctor/mommy tries to connect with her. There is a happy ending to this...doctor/mom learned in less than an hour how we therapists connect and dialogue thru touch, and has learned a great deal more about the importance of presence, love, and intention,and why there is significant public demand for our care. (They are trainable) Jim Clear NCTMB
Anonymous
No Once a person recieves a "massage certification", they should be allowed to perform massage. If no certification is received, then not even a doctor should be able to perform massage.

Anonymous
No Medical doctors needs to concentrate more on proper evaluation of their patients. A massage therapist often depends on a doctor's expertise in diagnosis and prescription to properly treat their clients.

Although patients may like the idea of getting diagnosed and treated by the same person, a doctor does not have the time to properly warm up the muscle tissue and work the surrounding areas that may also be affected. 'Specificity' can not be properly provided as would be received from a massage therapist.

And imagine what the waiting time would be like at the doctor's office then!!

If a medical doctor wants to provide massage therapy, add a massge therapist to the staff. Chiropractor's recognized the benefits along time ago.

Anonymous
No Medical doctors needs to concentrate more on proper evaluation of their patients. A massage therapist often depends on a doctor's expertise in diagnosis and prescription to properly treat their clients.

Although patients may like the idea of getting diagnosed and treated by the same person, a doctor does not have the time to properly warm up the muscle tissue and work the surrounding areas that may also be affected. 'Specificity' can not be properly provided as would be received from a massage therapist.

And imagine what the waiting time would be like at the doctor's office then!!

If a medical doctor wants to provide massage therapy, add a massge therapist to the staff. Chiropractor's recognized the benefits along time ago.


Yes with proper massage training

Anonymous
Yes Here we go again! The same type of inflamatory questions that were asked on Acupuncture Today's web site. Without question the answer is yes, yes, YES!!! Physicians weather MD, DC, DO, DDS, DPM have the greatest academic abilities and are some of the greatest minds in this country. Maybe we should reverse this question and ask if massage therapists should be held to the entrance requirements of physicians as they are in China. Maybe we should make massage therapists complete the much more stiringent academic requirements of physicians. Maybe we should hold massage therapists to the practice standards of physicians. The training and ability of physicians in understanding health is far greater than that of a massage therapist. Besides, massage is such a non invasive therapy that it would be only due to gross incompetance to cause injury. Who is the daft person who thinks up these questions that cause turf wars and rifts between health care professions. We should be looking for ways to work togeather and not create points to be at each others throats. The great Carnack the Magician predicts that future poll questions will be; Should massage, should Chiropractic Physicians practice massage, should Vetrinarians, Podiatrists, Dentists, Osteopaths, etc. etc. etc. Come on people lets get real! Physicians have the gretest amount of training when it comes to the body and should be able to practice massage. Massage therapists on the other hand have far inferior training then physicians and connot practice Medicine. This is a natural law in academics. Whoever has the biggest baddist degree is king! Got it? Good!


Yes They should be allowed to perform massage on clients. However, they should only be allowed to perform if they have taken all the appropriate classes.

Anonymous
No I don't know of any Medical school training that teach,train, or inform for that matter any thing about Massage. I don't know why so many other professional's feel that they can do Massage. None of the many professionals that think or want to do massage would ever let a Massage Therapist or for that matter any one infringe on their training and minimize their training.
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