Massage Today
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Poll Results for the following Question:

If you could only read one section of Massage Today, what would it be?

Results:

Top news stories
28.0%
Columnist articles
30.6%
Spa section
9.6%
Poll results
4.5%
Front-page graph
8.3%
Other feature stories
14.6%
Other
4.5%

Total Respondents: 157

Comments:

Note: These comments are reproduced as written by visitors to this Web site.
They have not been edited for content, grammar, or spelling.



Columnist articles I particularly like some of the more technical how-to
article

Anonymous
Top news stories I find it strange that all the graphs on the front page have Massage Therapy as the leading choice.

Anonymous
Columnist articles I especialy appreciate the updates That I get from Vivian Madison on insurance billing.

Anonymous
Other feature stories I WOULD LIKE TO GET MORE INFORMATION ON WORK RELATIONSHIPS BETWEEN OWNER AND INDEPENDENT CONTRACTORS IN THE WORK PLACE WHAT RIGHTS DOES THE WORKER HAVE (CAN A OWNER MAKE A PERSON STAY WHEN THERE ARE NO CLIENTS

Anonymous
Other feature stories Ralph's column because he is the most refreshing voice in the MT field today.

Anonymous
Other feature stories BRAVO to those who speak there mind and THANKS to MASSAGE TODAY for allowing it. As long as our profession is not strangled by the goverment we will continue to be able to help people in a way no other medical profession can.

Another A M E N on the comments about being nationally certified. SKILL SHOULD BE THE DETERMINING FACTOR to carry the title of being so called NATIONALLY CERTIFIED.


 Hi, Love receiving the magazine. I usually read articles about techniques, legal events, trends in the industry and employee relations etc. .

I could use more business operations inforamation or consulting articles for people like myself who are not only therapists, but own a store front and are operating legally and either hiring therapists or renting space to them. How to price the rent and how to keep accurate books, working out the schedules etc.

It seems when hiring, I find therapists that think they can just show up and someone will provide clients for them.

It's frustrating, because in the 7 years I have been a practice owner I have done all the marketing, networking and advertising to hand off clients to unappreciative therapists who do not contribute to the "good of the whole". They don't understand no matter how I've attempted to explain it to them that they need to help cover the overhead with their efforts bringing in new clients so they can continue to receive a decent paycheck. They back stab ownership, gossip to clients about other clients and co-workers, and think they could do it better, but they don't make any effort to "help" things be better. Their ethics as an employee are not professional. And then they wonder why they loose clients and their employer is unhappy. Many don't set personal goals, and many have taken new clients home instead of bringing them to the storefront, even though I have tried to coach them to build their own clientel at our location and provide the sheets, towels, stereos, music oils and lotions.

Personally, I have a background of 13 years experience in cosmetic sales and management. To quote a wise lady, "if it is to be it's up to me". I have no trouble bringing in new clients. I don't know what the massage schools teach here in my area, but the students coming out of schools don't seem to be self starters. The beauty schools do a better job of educating the cosmetologists on how to get, keep and appreciate clientel.

The area here in Chicago is being saturated with massage schools. Here in IL there is local jurisdiction over massage establishments until the new legislation passes. It really irks me when a therapist sets up their table at home and is not working legally within the law and taking money under the table, not reporting their income. This hurts all of us in the long run, as eventually the government will crack down on our industry the way they have done with the nail care and beauty salon industry and enforce state regulations for massage establishments. I fought city regulations and waited over 6 months to provide massage. Had to go to the board of health and all that to be "legal". Those of us who are legal and follow the laws, are the ones who are trying to increase the credibility of therapeutic massage. People working out of their homes should take into consideration the long-term effects of their professional image on our industry as a whole.

So I will look forward to more articles that address some of the issues I have listed above.

 I like to read any reports that support claims against the AMTA.


Columnist articles I find the articles to be very informative.

Anonymous
Columnist articles 
Other feature stories
COMMENT WITH A GRIPE

Most every issue has alot of interesting articles in it. My only complaint would be that alot of the articles are to political in nature and not enough emphasis is put on the massage therapist as an individual health care professional.

MASSAGE TODAY caters to much to the AMTA and the standards THEY set for our profession. I am not nationally certified and am not planning to be until the whole emphasis of being nationally certified is based on the SKILL,rather than the ability to pass a written test.
To this article, might I add a very loud A M E N !!!



Columnist articles  I find that 'shared views' offer more REAL news
and INSIGHTS then most of the other articles as
a whole.


Top news stories And OF COURSE OTHER NEW TECHNIQUES THAT OUT


Other I am a registered therapist in Wisconsin. Massage Today does not address my modality, AMMA Therapy or list it on the website.

Anonymous
Front-page graph I am a registered therapist in Wisconsin. Massage Today does not address my modality, AMMA Therapy or list it on the website.


Other feature stories 
COMMENT WITH A GRIPE

Most every issue has alot of interesting articles in it. My only complaint would be that alot of the articles are to political in nature and not enough emphasis is put on the massage therapist as an individual health care professional.

MASSAGE TODAY caters to much to the AMTA and the standards they set for our profession. I am not nationally certified and am not planning to be until the whole emphasis of being nationally certified is based on the skill rrether than the ability to pass a written test.
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