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Poll Results for the following Question:

In your view, which association best serves the interests of its membership and the profession?

Results:

Associated Bodywork & Massage Professionals (ABMP)
57.4%
American Massage Therapy Association (AMTA)
14.6%
International Massage Association (IMA)
6.1%
I don't feel any of the current associations provide adequate representation
21.9%

Total Respondents: 951

Comments:

Note: These comments are reproduced as written by visitors to this Web site.
They have not been edited for content, grammar, or spelling.


Anonymous
American Massage Therapy Association (AMTA) 

Anonymous
American Massage Therapy Association (AMTA) As your example below importunes, since it wouldn't be professional to say your poll "stinks," instead let's say it's a poorly stated question because it's comparing apples and oranges. Should privately owned, for profit businesses that are controlled by owners rather than "members" be rightly called associations? DOH! .... uh, I mean, there may be good reason for you to reconsider the incongruous aspects of your logic here Old Chaps.

Anonymous
American Massage Therapy Association (AMTA) Non-profit, excellent insurance, a sense of community not offered by the other organizations, has enhanced my ability to perform my career.

Anonymous
American Massage Therapy Association (AMTA) The only TRUE association, one that is non-profit and serves the profession and its MEMBERS is AMTA....the others on your list are neither non-profit nor member driven/based associations. What are you thinking confusing the issue of associations once again by comparing apples and oranges. How irresponsible of you to once again muddy the waters of understanding. Unfortunately, many practitioners don't understand the difference between a real membership organization that contributes to our profession with programs and materials and an insurance agent posing as an organization while getting wealthy off their hard earned dollars. When was the last time that either of the insurance companies you mention donated substantial sums of money to both COMTA or any massage research foundation???? Really, you should be ashamed of yourself....how are you helping the profession by this kind of poll?

Anonymous
American Massage Therapy Association (AMTA) I have been a massage therapist for the past ten years. I have also been a member of the AMTA for the past ten years. the reason I chose the AMTA and continue to be a member is that the AMTA is the only Professional Massage Organization that is not for profit!! The money I pay to the AMTA goes toward foundation grants, research, scholarshops, chapter funding, salaries, education, publication etc. There is NO profit, there are no shareholders. The AMTA is a member driven organization run by volunteers. The AMTA is the only organization that has State Chapters providing support to members in their locale. The AMTA supports and promotes continuing education for the advancement of our profession. It may cost a little more to belong to the AMTA but the standards and ethics of the organization make it worth every penny.

Anonymous
American Massage Therapy Association (AMTA) AMTA is without question best serving the intersts of both its membership and the profession. It is a democratic organization, membership-driven. That means it is the will of its membership that drives policy. While democracy is not always pretty, it is BY FAR the most fair way to give the individual members of an association an opportunity to have an influence on policy. AMTA offers excellent benefits to its membership as well as supporting massage therapy research which is the only way that certain sectors of our society are ever going to accept that massage therapy is an effective healing modality and recognize the extent of that healing influence. We need this research to take place in order to ensure that the benefits of massage therapy become available to the greatest numbers of people, thus ensuring that people will have the therapy available to them when they need it.

ABMP is a corporation run by a couple of stockholders out of Colorado. The membership has no mechanism to influence the workings of the corporation in any fair and representative way. IMA is not even in the running. frankly, I am amazed that you would even ask this question. Just look at the facts. The answer is obvious.

Anonymous
American Massage Therapy Association (AMTA) The comments you have made regarding AMTA is false! I am very dissappointed in Massage Today regarding the comments you have made. We do not want to read this sort of thing.


Associated Bodywork & Massage Professionals (ABMP) Having been a member of ABMP for nearly 3 years, I have chosen them as my choice for the association best serving it's members and our profession.

I don't know what to think of AMTA.. especially after reading of their attempts to 'stifle' Massage Today, in their lawsuit to prevent therapists from receiving the periodical as well as the benefits of Massage Today's free referral directory.
I feel AMTA's lawsuit is very out of line.

Massage and Bodywork, in my view, is a business for servicing the clients, so we may provide knowledgeable, professional, therapeutic care/service to those clients. The ABMP, NCBTMB, and Massage Today, I feel, are all serving the profession, and us, as therapists and members, with the best information to help us better serve our clients.

I was very disappointed to read that the AMTA had filed it's lawsuit, and would attempt to prevent Massage Today from being a part of our profession.

Carl E. Lundberg, NCTMB
Las Vegas, Nevada


Anonymous
 You need another category: Not Sure. I'm not familiar enough with the organizations to have an opinion ... but what I've seen of the AMTA makes me totally uninterested in membership. I don't like bullies.


American Massage Therapy Association (AMTA) Please remove my name and addresses from all lists that you sell to advertisers. AMTA had my info on a restricted list and honored my request not to be spammed and junk-mailed to death. Since your paper appeared in my mailbox, I've been receiving much unwelcome junk. How rude of you.

Thank you,

Denise M. Logsdon
2756 Manoomin Pl
Va Beach, VA 23451

Anonymous
American Massage Therapy Association (AMTA) I believe you guys handled your case inapporpriately and that you are in the wrong in this lawsuit. You would do well to try to settle this out of court. The AMTA is head and shoulders above the rest and is acting in the best interests of their members. I have enjoyed your newsletter and hope that you resolve this ethically and fast as what you are doing is possibly trying to drive a wedge deeper into the divisions of massage therapists. We must all work together for the best but we must work within the system. Buying the mailing list would have been a whole lot cheaper for you in the long run. I hope that if you approach AMTA that they will be willing to settle this with you amicably.

Anonymous
American Massage Therapy Association (AMTA) I can see where IMA and AMTA are included in the poll, but why ABMP. ABMP is a business like Sam's Clubs. Individuals there are members only in title. They are in fact just customers.

Anonymous
 ABMP WOULD BE THE BEST IF IT WASN'T FOR THEIR HIGHER FEES (AS COMPARED TO THE IMA, FOR EXAMPLE). AMTA HAS DONE THE MOST WITH LEGISLATION, BUT BY ALL ACCOUNTS THEY ARE BECOMING TOO BIG AND TOO BUERACRATIC WHICH LOOKS LIKE IT MAY HURT THEM.

Anonymous
 ABMP WOULD BE THE BEST IF IT WASN'T FOR THEIR HIGHER FEES (AS COMPARED TO THE IMA, FOR EXAMPLE).


Associated Bodywork & Massage Professionals (ABMP) I have been with ABMP over 10 years and have enjoyed my association with them.Its very expansive and includes other techniques and modalities. I practice aromatherapy and massage as well as teach classes in aromatherapy,self-care and holistic health education.
Justine Cudzewicz-ABMP member

Anonymous
Associated Bodywork & Massage Professionals (ABMP)  I joined ABMP in December '00 and have been surprised at how quickly my questions are answer by their staff. I like the web site they have set up. I'm a certified massage therapist and hope that AMTA and ABMP work together, not familiar with IMA, to get my state, INDIANA, liscensed quickly.
Until AMTA sued Massage Today I had almost joined their organization, I WILL NOT. How can AMTA copywrite someone's personal name? Massage Today's referal is another media for "Professionals" to generate clients. ABMP did not sue Massage Today thus proving, in my opinion, they support "EDUCATING" the public about massage topics while allowing potential client referals from their web site.

Anonymous
Associated Bodywork & Massage Professionals (ABMP) Need a space for ALL the organization listed are good!
ABMP is a great organization. They people are helpful, knowledgeable and friendly. My work is only partically massage, it includes craniosacral work, energy work, and emotional release work. ABMP acknowledges bodywork in their organization title. It works for me.
AMTA appears to be a very good organization too. It has done a lot to organize legislation action in the state of Washington. Glad for their participation. I know members of AMTA and many are more than massage therapist. However,they prefer the more politically and socially active AMTA organization. IMA,am not personal familiar with but other MT have told me it is a good organization.


Associated Bodywork & Massage Professionals (ABMP) Covers all the bases without overcharging.


Associated Bodywork & Massage Professionals (ABMP) I hace been a member of both AMTA & ABMP I have chosen ABMP because of better support. Local massage members can form assistances to new members and work togather. we can also refer clients to others in our group. Have local meetings and help others keep apprised of new changes. we work through ABMP as our source. Orginazed massage theraps working togather.

Ask ABMP about forming your ABMP support Group.


Anonymous
 I look forward to getting Massage Today in my mailbox. When I received the first issue I couldn't believe it was FREE and provided much needed information to all massage professionals.

Every week I get at least 6 pieces of mail from AMTA
members that have inappropriately taken my name from the registry book. (Read below the table of contents in your registry book for the usage rules.)

However one question on AMTA's renewal is:

"We make AMTA member lists available to selected organizations. Do you wish to
recieve these mailings?"

To my knowledge this is the first time that question has been asked by the AMTA. Somehow they feel it is ok for them to "makes available" or sell it's own registry mailing list and to SELECTIVELY enforce their copywrite on the registry to "protect my privacy"

Unfortunately the AMTA is going to see a big membership drop from this latest lawsuit. And after 11 years I am one of those looking elsewhere. "

This lawsuit is SOUR GRAPES. Imagine MassageToday.com was chosen by the cable stations to be "THE DIFINATIVE SOURCE OF RELIABLE INFORMATION ON THE INTERNET."

Move over AMTA, MassageToday.com is moving in. Didn't your Mommies teach you to share?


American Massage Therapy Association (AMTA) I say this primarily becuase this is the organization that I am familiar with. I have no idea what the other professional organizations have to offer. But the more I am involved with the AMTA (serving on the local board)the more I run into things that I do not like. But I'm not sure that there is an organization out there that is any better, and I have serious doubts that any would offer me better representation.


American Massage Therapy Association (AMTA)  I have been very happy with the extra support that I have received from being a member in the AMTA. They have provided me with a wealth of information to help me not only grow my practice but enable me to become the best therapist that I can be. It's a membership that I now only pay for but actually receive something in return, something that I did not find in the other associations.

Anonymous
 I don't have enough information on IMA and AMTA to compare.


Associated Bodywork & Massage Professionals (ABMP) I have to say that I am not very familiar with I.M.A. and am an A.B.M.P. member, but from what I have seen the A.M.T.A. is way to far on the "control freak" side for me to be comfortable with them.

Anonymous
Associated Bodywork & Massage Professionals (ABMP) I feel it's really important to have standards of
education while considering the needs of different
modalities. It seems there has been a struggle to
keep everything from being labeled "massage". I
feel ABMP has worked for its members to keep
their interests protected while keeping members
informed.

Anonymous
I don't feel any of the current associations provide adequate representation Case in point, AMTA's current litigation against MP Media, which, in essence, uses the member's hard earned money to establish and play tug-of-war with the financial value of their name, simultaneously impeding that same member from utilizing MP Media's services to advertise and expand their ability to practice.

I have been practicing for over (14) years, and have observed that these so-called associations do not represent their members, which only represent a fraction of the actual practitioners in this arena. As soon as they get your money and the weight of your name, they become drunk with power.

The proof is in our practice. The dance with government, ie. permits and licensing, has become more restrictive and degrading, not less. The current environment and requirements to be main stream and in the public eye is working to drive more practitioners underground than available and openly practicing.

My experience and observations have concluded that these associations are "full of themselves", have lost sight of whom they represent, and definitely do not play well with others. In a field defined by Holistic Health and Healing, they certainly do not Walk Their Talk!


I don't feel any of the current associations provide adequate representation MONEY MONEY MONEY DUES DUES DUES. Well i know that in order to be a member there is a cost. I never realy had any direct information as to new clients, or any referals. Its only to put it on a busniss cars or to tell the othere therapist that you are amember to. The true value in any assoc. is what YOU can do for that assoc. and the benifits that other therpist obtain form it.
Thanks Mike Imbrunone

Anonymous
Associated Bodywork & Massage Professionals (ABMP) ABMP has been really helpful to me over the year that I have been with them. I enjoy their magazine, which is why I joined them in the first place as at student. They were also more affordable then the competition.
I do not have any experience with the other associations, so my vote is not an altogether educated one.

edquisenberry
Associated Bodywork & Massage Professionals (ABMP) One of the chief benefits of a professional association should be it's referral directory. I realize that I am within my first year of practice, yet I would have anticipated the referral benefit by now. I am likely naive about this conclusion.

I do appreciate the assistence I've received from ABMP regarding helping me with additional associations and health networks. I do appreciate their insurance benefits. I do appreciate their professional journal. There is a significant amount of benefit to the association and I will not give up my association to ABMP.


I don't feel any of the current associations provide adequate representation The question, unfortunately, does not correlate with the fourth answer. "Serving the interests of its membership and the profession" is not the same thing as "providing adequate representation."

A more careful reading of the survey questions would lend more credibility to the results.

-David Palmer


Associated Bodywork & Massage Professionals (ABMP) I am e-mailing from work. Just letting you know because the e-mail address I'm registered under is not the same as here. Thanks!

Anonymous
Associated Bodywork & Massage Professionals (ABMP) ABMP's philosophy is truly consistent with the field of healing and they walk their talk!


Associated Bodywork & Massage Professionals (ABMP) Thank you for your publication.

I was a member of AMTA for over 15 years and I have to commend them on their political and legislative work.

However, at the working level I have found the ABMP provides the services I want today.

The trend seems to be to expand massage therapy in both the medical model and in the spa field It would be a good idea for the two associations to begin addressing both arenas. This could involve other modalities provided by massage therapists which involves addtional licensing in some states. e.g. facials/skin care.



Anonymous
Associated Bodywork & Massage Professionals (ABMP) I am an ABMP member and have been satisfied with them.
I am under some peer pressure to switch to AMTA which
I was going to do until I read the story about the law
suit. My main interest in the organization is
insurance-which ABMP does. There may be some perks
involved if I become nationally certified, which I
believe is only AMTA but I won't agree to go with an
organization who wants to tell me who I can talk to
and what I can read. I know nothing of IMA except
that it has cheap insurance. So


Associated Bodywork & Massage Professionals (ABMP) I have been a member of ABMP for nearly 7 years. I am pleased with their publication and their responsiveness when I have had a problem or question. I am not in favor of state regulation and see more requirements for therapists through AMTA for national certification and state licensure. I presently have 750 hours of certified training and am frequently reading updating material. I am in private full time practice for 6 and a half years and expect to continue with ABMP.


Associated Bodywork & Massage Professionals (ABMP) I feel abmp gives it's memebers great service and referrals. I get esthetic insurance and massage insurance at reasonable rates.

Rita Comiskey


Associated Bodywork & Massage Professionals (ABMP) My vote for ABMP is based on the fact that I subscribe only to ABMP and truly have little knowledge regarding the others. I enjoy ABMP massage magazine with its many and varied articles on health/massage. Keep up the good work. It's onward and upward! :-) Have a lovely day. God Bless You.

Tina Schafer

Anonymous
 I am not a member of the other associations so I really can't compare. However, I am pleased with ABMP


Associated Bodywork & Massage Professionals (ABMP) I am a member of ABMP. I have not given any of the other associations a chance in order to make a realistic vote between the three. I will say that I am very happy with ABMP so far and have no reason to change at the moment.


Associated Bodywork & Massage Professionals (ABMP) ABMP serves me well!


Associated Bodywork & Massage Professionals (ABMP) I have been very satified with the service that ABMP gives. I can email or call at anytime and get the answers I need, the info is wonderful in the mag. and When I heard about the Law suit with AMTA I would never sign up with them! This is an outrage! WE are out of control in the country!
I feel the more info I receive, the better I will be, in order to better service my clients. I like the Idea that if I have something to say I can, whether it is to ABMP or to Massage Today. Thank you for doing a Wonderful Job!



Associated Bodywork & Massage Professionals (ABMP) very high level of professionalism (magazine)
addresses current issues (magazine)
knowledgable and helpful staff


suyin karlsen
ABMP membership id: 454608


Anonymous
I don't feel any of the current associations provide adequate representation I dont know anymore. What the AMTA is pursuing with this legal action has me wondering what I am spending money on for a membership? Attorney fees or supporting it's members?


Associated Bodywork & Massage Professionals (ABMP) They have sent me more material than anyone and provide lost cost insurance.
The question I have, however, is are they fighting for our rights with legislation?

Anonymous
American Massage Therapy Association (AMTA) AMTA funds massage research and I am proud to be part of an organization that does that. The national orgainzation has tons of help and information to help the new member/new massage therapist get started.

I also, like the AMTA as it as it gives me a opportunity to join other volunteers in helping our profession come out of the dark ages where massage is associated with sexual services. I live in a state with no regulation for massage at the state level AMTA helps members deal with massage parlor ordinances. AMTA members will come to city council meetings and help members change local laws. ABMP, while it does help its members in these cases, has no local volunteer structure to help massage therapists. The AMTA does not incourage state level regulation unless there is a coalition of all massage therapists that support state level legislation. I have seen *no* evidence to support the much banded about assertion that AMTA wants to regulate every and all massage therapists regardless.

AMTA fees are not that much higher than ABMP and AMTA is a non-profit organization. ABMP money goes into the owners pocket, where with AMTA the money all goes back to the membership in one form or another.

AMTA has a presence on the national scene and was instrumental in getting Playboy Magazine to pull the "Certified Massage Therapist" layout Playboy had planned to do a few years ago. I like being part of an organization that has enough clout to protect the profession in this way.




Associated Bodywork & Massage Professionals (ABMP) I have been a licensed massage therapist and educator since 1981. During that time, I have belonged to all three of the massage associations. Although it is a few dollars cheaper, I found IMA to have no other benefits than the malpractice insurance. The AMTA does an excellent job of promoting our profession to the world, and helps with legal issues. However, they often have an "attitude problem". For example,one of my students tried to join AMTA, and found the person on the phone to be rude and uncooperative. The AMTA does not have as good "customer service" as does the ABMP.The AMTA should stop acting like royalty.

Anonymous
Associated Bodywork & Massage Professionals (ABMP) I love the magizine. I would like to see some classes that members can attend for continued education.


Associated Bodywork & Massage Professionals (ABMP) I concur with most of the exceptional comments made regarding the ABMP. I have been in this profession for over 20 years and was delighted to find an alternative to the AMTA.

I appreciate the encouragement from the ABMP to use whatever technique is "within the scope and boundaries of practice for the benefit of the patient/client".

The ABMP has uplifted the business standards and practices of our profession. For this I am truly grateful! You have helped to bring integrity and have validated us as we truly are - Healthcare Professionals!




Associated Bodywork & Massage Professionals (ABMP) I have belonged to AMTA and ABMP. ABMP provided more info for marketing, starting a business, materials to provide to clients, etc etc. I felt like I was getting "support" from ABMP. AMTA, wasn't a "negative" experience, but I felt like I had purchased an insurance policy and got a newsletter every so often. But, there wasn't much in the way of written "help" or ideas. ABMP has really provided the materials I needed for my practice, the welcome packet and things to get started were very "Real" and to the point. ABMP provides a WONDERFUL magazine, ideas ideas ideas, and... of course, insurance. :) be well. kim

Anonymous
 The AMTA is the most professional organization serving the massage profession today. The AMTA requires their members to adhere to certain standards and ethics, complete a full massage curriculum and continue their studies in bodywork. My favorite perk is their National Massage Therapist Locator service. The other massage organizations are "for profit" organizations that accept almost anyone who is able to pay the membership fee.


Associated Bodywork & Massage Professionals (ABMP) Many years ago I was taken to an AMTA convention to check it out. I met with some officials and their attitudes were condesending and not of service. Even though I was well trained in Oriental Massage I was told I had to certify in Swedish massage to qualify for membership and take their test.

ABMP was the opposite and respected my training.


Anonymous
Associated Bodywork & Massage Professionals (ABMP) I have been a member since 1996 recently I have been disappointed in the magazine that seems to feature more spa activities than massage. For those of us whose focus is on therapeutic massage, the spa treatments are fine and nice however I pay my dues for massage info. My believe is that spa treatments are a great adjunct to massage however they do not replace massage. I have been frustrated trying to purchase supplies and equipment for my therapy center and seem to continue find more and more spa "stuff" in our massage magazines and catalogs.


I don't feel any of the current associations provide adequate representation Let me keep this brief. IMHO, AMTA represents schools at the expense of MT's. It also serves the national organization's licensing agenda at the expense of its' members wishes. AMTA (national) is manipulative and self-serving; they are infamous for backing discriminatory licensing proposals, and for shoving their "license and certify" mentality down the throats of the profession. They also like to wield their power like the 10 ton elephant, suing anybody who dares to step on their perceived prerogatives. (Massage Today is not the first!)

ABMP was designed to primarily serve members' business interests, not their professional ones. They sell insurance (an expensive way to get it, if that's all you want) Oh, sorry, they provide it as a membership "benefit". They also put out a magazine. They claim to have a balanced approach to licensing, but in fact they are totally against it. I have heard that they come to the aid of the little guy (e.g. in WV a few years back.) I used to belong to this group but I dropped them like a hot potato when they started accepting cosmetologists as members several years ago. From my perspective, there is no way an organization can serve the needs of two disparate groups. MT's professional needs and cosmetologists professional needs are just too different, even if some MT's do spa services and some cosmetologists do foot and scalp massages.

IMA was formed a few years ago by one Will Green, a school owner from Washington DC. My personal opinion is that he is slime. The man was advertising outrageous claims on the web about the benefits of massage and how much money a person could make after taking his short correspondence course. His claims about physiology would be laughable if they weren't so damaging! He seems to have decided that his pecuniary interests would be better served by imposing extremely high mandatory schooling on the profession, at least to provide "medical" massage for insurance reimbursement. I don't know about Mr. Green's educational background, but if he ever took an anatomy class, he seems to have forgotten everything he learned so that he could make stuff up.

IMA pretty much just sells insurance to whatever group wants it. The cost is not bad, but you can get it even cheaper from one of Massage Today's vendors. There's no point in funneling your money to a self-important charlatan when you don't have to!

In short, all these groups have high negatives to me. If I want insurance or other benefits they offer, I am confident that I can get them individually in the marketplace without feuling the associations' overt or hidden agendas.

Sincerely,
Donald F. Schiff, BS, BUS.
NM LMT #8
NM Registered MT Instructor #I-112


I don't feel any of the current associations provide adequate representation Let me keep this brief. IMHO, AMTA represents schools at the expense of MT's. It also serves the national organization's licensing agenda at the expense of its' members wishes. AMTA (national) is manipulative and self-serving; they are infamous for backing discriminatory licensing proposals, and for shoving their "license and certify" mentality down the throats of the profession. They also like to wield their power like the 10 ton elephant, suing anybody who dares to step on their perceived prerogatives. (Massage Today is not the first!)

ABMP was designed to primarily serve members' business interests, not their professional ones. They sell insurance (an expensive way to get it, if that's all you want) Oh, sorry, they provide it as a membership "benefit". They also put out a magazine. They claim to have a balanced approach to licensing, but in fact they are totally against it. I have heard that they come to the aid of the little guy (e.g. in WV a few years back.) I used to belong to this group but I dropped them like a hot potato when they started accepting cosmetologists as members several years ago. From my perspective, there is no way an organization can serve the needs of two disparate groups. MT's professional needs and cosmetologists professional needs are just too different, even if some MT's do spa services and some cosmetologists do foot and scalp massages.

IMA was formed a few years ago by one Will Green, a school owner from Washington DC. My personal opinion is that he is slime. The man was advertising outrageous claims on the web about the benefits of massage and how much money a person could make after taking his short correspondence course. His claims about physiology would be laughable if they weren't so damaging! He seems to have decided that his pecuniary interests would be better served by imposing extremely high mandatory schooling on the profession, at least to provide "medical" massage for insurance reimbursement. I don't know about Mr. Green's educational background, but if he ever took an anatomy class, he seems to have forgotten everything he learned so that he could make stuff up.

IMA pretty much just sells insurance to whatever group wants it. The cost is not bad, but you can get it even cheaper from one of Massage Today's vendors. There's no point in funneling your money to a self-important charlatan when you don't have to!

In short, all these groups have high negatives to me. If I want insurance or other benefits they offer, I am confident that I can get them individually in the marketplace without feuling the associations' overt or hidden agendas.

Sincerely,
Donald F. Schiff, BS, BUS.
NM LMT #8
NM Registered MT Instructor #I-112

Anonymous
Associated Bodywork & Massage Professionals (ABMP) Fantastic publication, cutting edge information, great member support and guidelines. Keep it up!

Anonymous
Associated Bodywork & Massage Professionals (ABMP) I am a member of ABMP. I don't have much experience with the other two.


Associated Bodywork & Massage Professionals (ABMP) I have belonged to both professional associations in the past at different times. I have chosen ABMP because I believe it represents well the interests of those massage therapists who want to practice medical/
treatment oriented massage and those massage therapists whose practice is primarily for relaxation.
With the push to elevate the status of massage in the medical community, there seems to be a trend to adopt the medical model and exclude the therapeutic value of massage as a relaxation process. I believe that ABMP gives space for practitioners in all types of practices. I also see the organization as trying to be more collaborative in working togheter with AMTA on licensing issues. I do not see that AMTA has wanted to work with ABMP. AMTA seems more competitive. This is just my perception.

Anonymous
Associated Bodywork & Massage Professionals (ABMP) I feel that ABMP is by far one of the best organization for its members. I was able to obtain a student membership at $39.00 in comparison to the other organizations at $150.00 +. Plus I will receive the $39.00 back when I join at a professional level. This benefit alone attracted me to ABMP because they seemed to understand the cost a student entails while going through school. I will stay a member of ABMP as long as, their first interest is in the best interest of their members!


Associated Bodywork & Massage Professionals (ABMP) Great personal service.


Associated Bodywork & Massage Professionals (ABMP) In 1999 I wanted to start a networking group for the Philadelphia Area Bodyworkers,and I called ABMP for help. ABMP was able to send out a notice to quite a few members in a large area surrounding Phila, and Delware County. There were over 30 respones. Today,with the support of ABMP, I am able to run a small netwoking group with educational speakers once a month for the health and wellnes of our practitioners. THANKS ABMP, for all your help.


Associated Bodywork & Massage Professionals (ABMP) I joined ABMP when I graduated from MT school in June '96. They have given me excellent service ever since. I have used their pamphlet prototypes in the liturature I use to promote my business, have listed my handmade soap and herbal bath product business at no charge in their "yellow pages', called on their help when Missouri was planning state regulations, etc. I've always had the sense that if I called or wrote, my voice would be heard and responded to.

The article about AMTA in your current issue reflects the kind of attitude I saw here in Missouri when we were developing regulations for therapists. Their actions appeared to be geared around serving their own agenda rather than focusing on the good of the whole community. This is of course one person's subjective experience.
Thanks for a great publication!


Associated Bodywork & Massage Professionals (ABMP) 
Before you came out with the Massage Today, I could not say which might have been better, But you took the inititive to bring a wealth of information to therapists with Massage Today. I have owned my own business for 7 wonderful years and stay very busy. Twelve hour days don't give me much time to read magazines etc., but I will take precious minutes between clients to read the well written articles. I would like to see a little more on seminars that offer C.E.U.'s.

Anonymous
Associated Bodywork & Massage Professionals (ABMP) ABMP keeps its members informed and represents us well in our state legislatures. Their benefits are great, and they are always ready to help. They are less political within the membership than AMTA.

Anonymous
Associated Bodywork & Massage Professionals (ABMP) If, in the process of sending this vote, my e-mail address does reach you, please do not add it to your or anyone else's mail list. Do not sell, rent or exchange my name or address. Thank you.


Associated Bodywork & Massage Professionals (ABMP) ABMP is an example of what professionalism is all about. This past April proved it when I had to file a personal property loss claim because of heavy smoke damage in my office. I was treated so kindly and with such promptness that I was back in business in a very short time.
Last week I renewed my membership. I was told I would receive my new materials and paperwork in two or three weeks. I had the package in my office in less than a week. I will stick with ABMP for as long as I am active in the massage profession.
The benefits and amenities that ABMP provides, such as Massage and Bodywork Magazine, supports, educates and keeps me up to date with all the latest trends in the profession. I am sold on ABMP! Elaine Kneeland


Associated Bodywork & Massage Professionals (ABMP) What a sad day that we can't have a united front for the best for all massage therapists, regardless of the association we belong to. This was the first I heard of the law suit, and can only serve to benefit lawyers as you mentioned.

As a member of AMBP, today I can truly say that I am proud to be a member with them, especially after 12 years of their support and help. We all need to look out of the box and to the future of what is best for all massage therapists, not being selfish, political, or controlling with that vision.

As an owner of two massage companies, these are exciting times of growth and reaching out to all that could use more TLC. May we pray for unity and peace among all that touch for health.

In Health,
Linda Penkala
Optimum Health for Life
Corporate Pit Stop


Associated Bodywork & Massage Professionals (ABMP) 



Associated Bodywork & Massage Professionals (ABMP) ABMP's efficient and friendly customer service, professionalism, and high level of clinical knowledge as presented in their journal has earned my loyalty for several years, and no doubt for years to come.

Anonymous
Associated Bodywork & Massage Professionals (ABMP) After some 15 years of AMTA membership, I changed to ABMP because AMTA is too controlling and political and seems to want to make their standards the only standard instead of serving the individual therapist in business.

ABMP provides everything paperwork wise with camera ready forms needed to start and maintain my business and still upholds the profession with an attidude that there are many choices in bodywork and honoring that diversity by offering choices in memberships. They are kind and have time for your questions and to me represent the loving, caring attitude that bodywork is all about. I love ABMP


Associated Bodywork & Massage Professionals (ABMP) I had been a member of AMTA for 4 years and just this year changed to ABMP due to the fact that AMTA was not serving my needs and was to exclusive. I prefer to have the information of other healing arts professionals available to me. While they have been positive massage PR to the public and lobbying efforts in Congress. I am very disappointed that they would use the members money to sue this paper. They have not even asked the members of their votes. We need more massage sources that will give us the information we want and need. Being self-employed and usually isolated by the type of profession we have, we need support and sources to other like-minded professionals. I have found Massage Today to be very informative and well written. AMTA is trying to make themselves exclusive, and this has been a problem that I found with the AMTA association, always being competitive instead of working with one another. If we don't want your newspaper mailed to us then we can notify you to take us off the mailing list. It is that simply. I don't care to have my name listed on a website without my consent, if Massage Today wants to do that then we need to be notified in a clear and precise manner in order to give that consent. Thank you.



Associated Bodywork & Massage Professionals (ABMP) ABMP is the one pushed at our school. I did not check into any others. I have not had to use the service much but when I have they have been very helpful.

Steve Lynn


Associated Bodywork & Massage Professionals (ABMP) When I graduated as a Massage Therapist in 1998 I thoroughly researched all the associatons availible for therapist needs. ABMP meet mine the best and was affordable. So far I am very satisfied. Thank you for this oppertunity with survey.
Staying in touch. Sheila


Associated Bodywork & Massage Professionals (ABMP) ABMP was by far the most helpful and friendly of the above organizations that I contacted before joining. They have assisted me in finding a new therapist for one of my clients that was relocating, while the other organization would not respond. I have recommended ABMP to my fellow therapists.


Associated Bodywork & Massage Professionals (ABMP) I am a member of ABMP and have always had good service
from them. My vote is based on that, not on the fact
that I've any other experience with the alternate
choices in your po

Anonymous
Associated Bodywork & Massage Professionals (ABMP) I commend ABMP for recognizing and serving the diverse
elements of the massage and bodywork community,
including the somatic education and therapy
practitioners. Their incredible publication "Massage
& Bodywork" magnificently represents the whole
emerging and flowering field of somatic movement and
bodywork with a broad spectrum of articles on cutting
edge developments.


Associated Bodywork & Massage Professionals (ABMP) From the very first information I had about AMTA, it seemed to be to be a poor choice, while ABMP had many great-sounding benefits and appeared to be a lot more open-minded. My suspicions seem to have been confirmed by the lawsuit....

I think Massage Today is a much-needed and accessible forum for discussion of important issues within and among the bodywork professions. Keep up the good work.

Claire Hanson, LMT
Santa Fe, NM


Associated Bodywork & Massage Professionals (ABMP) I like the insurance and the magazine.


Associated Bodywork & Massage Professionals (ABMP) ABMP has "always" addressed my questions, provided detailed information, referred me to someone else in the organization if the person I was speaking with did not know the answer. In addition to their professional demeanor, everyone that I have spoken with has been very friendly.


Associated Bodywork & Massage Professionals (ABMP) I not only teach Alternative Therapies at the colleges but I do pain work also,,, I joined ABMP for several reasons,,
Just like the motto says, "expect more" they are there when you need them and they didn't talk about the other organizations in a bad way,, when I called and taliked to amta they had nothing good to say about the others,, also the practitioners who belong to amata are brain washed into thinking they are the best,,, they don't want to hear that acupressure can cure,, they only except massage,,, they are not open to the people we are tryig to help and heal,,, ABMP has their organization open to all professionals with proof of their education,,,

Anonymous
American Massage Therapy Association (AMTA) Basically, their name meets the need better than ABMP


Associated Bodywork & Massage Professionals (ABMP) ABMP definately covers more of a wide variety of therapies that professionals today are providing for their clients. I offer Shiatsu bodywork therapy (and other services) and I'm also a member of AOBTA. My profession is included in the association name: ABMP (Associated Bodywork and Massage Professionals). All of the others listed by massageToday.com would not include Asian bodywork therapies and I would not be interested in becoming a member of these other organizations. Thank you.


Associated Bodywork & Massage Professionals (ABMP) I voted ABMP because the associates relate to the practitioner as an important person and seems eager and equiped with appropriate information for the presented situation.


signed:

R.B.A.T.

Anonymous
Associated Bodywork & Massage Professionals (ABMP) I feel the ABMP best represents my needs as I'm a Reiki practitioner. They provide my insurance and I still stay in touch with the massage world. I didn't feel AMTA would have supported my needs as much. However, if my profession was massage therapy, I would probably say the AMTA as I really like their research arm and the energy they devote to it.

There are strengths and weaknesses to both the AMTA and the ABMP and I find I get lots or information from both of their magazines. I wish there was more colaboration between the two associations.


Associated Bodywork & Massage Professionals (ABMP) The prices are competitive.
The staff are:
friendly
helpful
courteous
knowledgeable
always willing to go the extra mile to help.


Associated Bodywork & Massage Professionals (ABMP) I used to be an AMTA member, was active in the local
chapter, and ABMP outperforms AMTA by far!!! They have
a better fee structure, better insuance, a top-drawer
certification program, and their handbooks and
graphic-support materials are light years beyond
anything I ever saw from AMTA. Add to that, polite and
knowledgeable people on the end of the
phone--diametrically opposed from my experiences
calling the AMTA


 I used to be an AMTA member, was active in the local
chapter, and ABMP outperforms AMTA by far!!


 I used to be an AMTA member, was active in the local
chapter, and ABMP outperforms AMTA by far!!


Associated Bodywork & Massage Professionals (ABMP) Of "The Big Four" (your poll omits the AOBTA), I always recommmend to my students that the ABMP gives the best bang for your buck. As an ABMP member for over a decade, I have always felt them responsive and supportive - unlike other bodywork organizations which I also belong to.


Associated Bodywork & Massage Professionals (ABMP) For the last 18 years I have watched this industry grow and I feel ABMP has served the profession well. I am not familiar with the IMA, but have felt the AMTA has been self serving, or perhaps that is just the individuals I have interactd with that represent the organization. My interactions with ABMP have been friendly as well as professional. Thank You for your interest. Diane Archer Ivey, Anatriptic Arts Practitioner.


I don't feel any of the current associations provide adequate representation You have omitted the leading massage therapy association in the nation. Although it is a state professional association, the FSMTA (FL State Massage Therapy Assn, Inc) has, in fact, led the nation in creating credibility for massage therapists; setting a number of national precedents.

If you are not familiar with the FSMTA, I highly recommend you research its accomplishments and include this association in your questionnaire.

Sherry Smith, LMT, RPP, CIMI


I don't feel any of the current associations provide adequate representation I have been an LMT in Fl. for 7 yrs. and Chapter President of a Florida State Massage Therapy Association chapter. It seemed to me that thier were more people looking to see what the association could do for them than the other way around.

Anonymous
American Massage Therapy Association (AMTA) Although I feel that the American Massage Therapy Association serves their members the best, I do feel that their fees are too expensive. Certified and/or licensed massage therapists have their license fee and other expenses. Why should we have another high expense to deal with?

Anonymous
I don't feel any of the current associations provide adequate representation What is really lacking in the massage community is a cohesive group with support at local and national levels. I would love to see all three main groups join as one and use the power of numbers to educate the public as to the benefits of massage. (if they could get over their differences and leave their egos at home)

Anonymous
I don't feel any of the current associations provide adequate representation I checked the "I don't feel..." box because of the law suite AMTA has filed against massagetoday.com. I believe their attitude is childish and totally unprofessional. In this country I believe I have the right to choose where I obtain information, or where I advertise myself as a massage therapist. I DO NOT believe they have the right to decide that for me. If they persist in this suit I will resign my membership with AMTA.


I don't feel any of the current associations provide adequate representation In my years as a Massage Therapist and as an Instructor/Director of a Massage School and also as a Massage therapist working in more then one state I have found that the National Associations have lost sight of the local issues. This often means the agenda of the directors of a given association is forced on to the local members of each association. Or in other areas, therapists that are members of an association and do not work and live in primary populous locations are left to pay memberships with few to no benefits. It would not surprise me to find that therapist in rural locations make up a major portion of each association. Yet in most associational issues these are the therapists that are:
¯ Not informed of legislative agendas
¯ Very poorly represented in elections
¯ Perceived as unimportant
¯ In general left to their own devises to
create awareness of massage in local
communities.
¯ Accused of lack of concern in issues by national organizers
It seems more and more that National associations increase memberships by offering the best rate on insurance and then using membership numbers to influence state legislators. I would not be surprised to see national association lobbing at legislative sessions to require by Law each therapist have personal insurance.
I dont mean to say all Associations are bad, poor, or do not represent their membership. But, with the question being posed as which association best serves the interests of its membership and the profession? This tends leave little room for a positive response. A major problem as I see it today is the lack of commonality and unity in the vision of the future of massage and its professionals, be they clinical, energetic, spa, or relaxation.

Alex Matthews RMT, MTI



I don't feel any of the current associations provide adequate representation I do not know much about the ABMP. They have grown in recent years and put out a good magazine but I don't know much about them, beyond that. The AMTA on the other hand has gotten way tooooo political for me and have their own agenda for survival that attacks others. The price of their magazine is way out-of-line for me and caters to advertisers rather then the professional. Massage is not about "legality". It is about health.


I don't feel any of the current associations provide adequate representation So many associations and related fees, and Massage Therapist are still in the dark.
I see no efforts from any of these associations to promote a good image for our profession;
If I am wrong, please correct me!

Anonymous
I don't feel any of the current associations provide adequate representation I don't see that massage associations are currently doing enough to educate the medical profession and the public at large about the benefits of massage therapy, rather they seem to be more interested in playing politics in the state capitols. Recently in Texas they have seen to it that we now have to have 6 CEUs per year in topics of business, anatomy etc. instead of technique. I don't see how this benefits the profession as a whole but rather a few who have the inside track to be the only approved providers of the CEUs.


American Massage Therapy Association (AMTA) By all means, the AMTA best serves the interest of the members in the profession, WITH THE EXCEPTION OF THIS MOST ASSININE PENDING LAWSUIT AGAINST MASSAGE TODAY,, I do not see how this will ever serve the public or massage therapy profession in a positive way.
vivian madison


Associated Bodywork & Massage Professionals (ABMP) The first year I practiced massage therapy I used IMA.
I changed to ABMP the following year because I was working as an apprentice at the Kalamazoo Center for the Healing Arts in Kalamazoo MI and that is the association all their therapists belonged to. I am pleased with all the services ABMP supplies to me.
I thought there would be little difference in ABMP or AMTA until I read this issues artical about the law suite AMTA has against Massage Today. I am appauled! Massage therapists need to stick together to support eachother and to educate Americans about massage and it's many awsome benefits. It feels to me like AMTA priorities are the bottom line cash and not the massage therapists that support their association. I personally am pleased to be a part of MasageLocator referral directory at Massage Today. If I were a member of AMTA I would not be renewing my membership with them.



I don't feel any of the current associations provide adequate representation I am with the AMTA, but it is because they offer me more insurance for my money. If they are going to be political, I wish they would go to Washington and lobby for better business for massage. Plenty of change to be wrought there.

kadlmt.


Associated Bodywork & Massage Professionals (ABMP) ABMP is not elitist. They don't presume to be better than anyone else. They are on top of things and open to suggestions and solutions. They are helpful for all questions asked and if they don't have an answer will research it and get back to you.










I don't feel any of the current associations provide adequate representation They all want to control what we do as therapists. IMA is probably the least involved. I belong to IMA. I was a little disturbed when Will Green sent the last newsletter promoting his classes and own agendas.


I don't feel any of the current associations provide adequate representation If AMTA is going to the lawyers because it's members want to belong to another association, it's a sorry day for the profession. I thought we lived in a free country where we could belong to whatever group we chose. I don't remember anyone from AMTA asking me if I wanted to sell my name to them...now that might stir another issue.
I think members who feel that their rights might be violated need to e-mail AMTA. I know I will.
Dee Millares, Gulf Coast, MS


 Because I have only belonged to the AMTA I can only base my opinion on that organization. The AMTA does try to promote the professional aspects of therapeutic massage however I feel that at times they take a "we know everything" stand. Often they are not open to a "melding of the minds" so to speak, of ideas from other individuals. The field of therapeutic massage sits on the line between physical medicine and complementary medicine and as such is a true component of integrative medicine. AMTA would do well to include all ideas in promoting the professional status of therapeutic massage.


I don't feel any of the current associations provide adequate representation When Richard and Sherri ran the AMTA it actually tried to accomplish something. Since then, they seem to be acquescing to the will of the AMTA and trying not to make waves.

Will Green seems to be all talk and no action.

The AMTA seeks total domination through its programs, wether the majority of other therapists want it ro not... If it had spent half the money PROMOTING all forms of massage,instead of putting doubts in the public mind about certain "other" practitioners; and risk of "harms" to the legislators, we'd all be making more money today, and probably be better respected.

Just once, I'd like to see a billboard that says: "Backache PAIN? Get a massage"! (Rather than a specific type, name, business or group; insinuating that THIS one is better or somehow best. Or the ONLY one.)


I don't feel any of the current associations provide adequate representation When Richard and Sherri ran the AMTA it actually tried to accomplish something. Since then, they seem to be acquescing to the will of the AMTA and trying not to make waves.

Will Green seems to be all talk and no action.

The AMTA seeks world domination through its programs. If it had spent half the money PROMOTING all forms of massage,instead of putting doubts in the public mind about certain "other" practitioners; and risk of "harms" to the legislators, we'd all be making more money today, and probably better respected.

Just once, I'd like to see a billboard that says: "Backache PAIN? Get a massage"!


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